Seine vs Vengeance

20th August 1800 - 21st August 1800
Part of : The French Revolutionary Wars (1793 - 1802)
Previous action : Action of 1800-08-04 4.8.1800
Next action : Attack on Ferrol 25.8.1800 - 26.8.1800

 

Great Britain

 
Ship NameCommanderNotes
Seine (36) David Milne (1763-1845)
 

République française

 
Ship NameCommanderNotes
La Vengeance (48) A M Pitot
 

Notes on Action


From the Naval Chronical Vol IV
On the morning of the 20th of August, a strange sail was observed from the Seine, standing to the northward, on the starboard tack, through the Mona Passage to which she immediately gave chase: it was sunset before they got sufficiently near to make her out plainly, when they perceived her to be a large frigate. About midnight the Seine brought the chace to action, but not so close as Captain David Milne wished; the ships suffered considerably in their rigging and sails during this brush; and, from that circumstance, departed for some time. On the morning of the 21st, the Seine brought the chase to close action and after severe contest for an hour and a half, she struck, and proved to be the Vengenace French frigate, commanded by Citizen Pitot, Capitaine de Vaisseau, mounting twenty-eight eighteen-pounders on the main-deck, sixteen twelve-pounders and eight forty-two pound carrouades on her quarter-deck and forecastle, with brass swivels on her gunwale

Mr George Milne, Second Lieutenant of the Seine, and twelve seamen were killed in the action, and twenty-nine wounded; among whom is the Lieutenant of Marines. The particulars of the loss on the part of the enemy are not yet ascertained, but it is supposed mast be considerable, from the loss of her fore mast, mizen mast, and njan-top-mast, which all fell on board Captain David Milne speaks in very high terms of the good conducl of his Officers and ship's company.

The French frigate, out of a complement of 453, has only brought into port 2?1 men. On board La Vengeance were five or six Generals, and several other Officers of the French army, who assisted wherever their talents could be of use during the engagement. La Vengeance had, we understand, near ten feet water in her hold when she came into Port Royal.

Captain Pitot has mentioned, that in the action he had with the Constellation, she struck three times; that he saw her in the morning, when his ship was entirely dismasted, and might have been made a prize of; but that the Constellation did not appear anxious to renew the struggle.

The Captain of La Vengeance is the same Officer who commanded La Renommee when taken by his Majesty's ship Alfred.


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