Action of 1812-07-06

Battle of Lyngør

6th July 1812 - 7th July 1812
Part of : The Napoleonic Wars (1803 - 1815)
Previous action : Attack at Laigueglia 27.6.1812
Next action : Action of 1812-08-02 2.8.1812

 

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

 
Ship NameCommanderNotes
Dictator (64) Alexander Wilmot Schomberg (1775-1850)5 killed, 24 wounded
Calypso (16) Henry Weir3 killed, 1 wounded and 2 missing
Podargus (14) William Robilliard9 wounded
Flamer (12) John Carter, Thomas England1 killed, 1 wounded
 

Denmark

 
Ship NameCommanderNotes
Najaden (36) Hans Peter Holm (1772-1812) Sunk
Laaland (18)  
Kiel (18)  
Samsoe (18)  
 

Notes on Action


DescriptionW005

On the 6th of July, in the evening, as the British 64-gun ship Dictator, Captain James Patteson Stewart, accompanied by the brig-sloops Calypso, 18, Captain Henry Weir, and Podargus, 14, Captain William Robilliard, and gun-brig Flamer, Lieutenant Thomas England, was off Mardoe on the Norway coast, the mast-heads of several vessels were seen over the rocks, known to be a Danish squadron, consisting of the new 40-gun frigate Nayaden, carrying 24-pounders on the main deck, and 48 guns in all, and the 18-gun brigs Laaland, Samsoe, and Kiel. Having a man on board the Podargus acquainted with the place, Captain Robilliard volunteered to lead in after the enemy ; but the Podargus unfortunately took the ground, just as she had entered the passage. Leaving the Flamer to attend her, Captain Stewart stood on with the 64 and the remaining brig. By 7 h. 30 m. p.m. the two vessels, the Calypso leading, had arrived within a mile of the Danish frigate and her consorts, then running, under a press of sail, inside the rocks. Shortly afterwards the engagement began between the Danish squadron and several gun-boats on one side, and the Dictator and Calypso, which latter, having grounded for a short time, was now astern of her consort, on the other. At 9 h. 30 m. P. M after having run 12 miles through a passage, in some places scarcely wide enough to admit the Dictator's studding sail booms to be out, Captain Stewart had the satisfaction to run his ship with her bow upon the shore, and her broadside bearing, within hailing distance, upon the Danish frigate and three brigs, all of whom had anchored close together, with springs on their cables, in the small creek of Lyngoe.

The Calypso closely followed the Dictator; and such was the well-directed fire opened from the two British vessels, especially from the 64, that the Nayaden, according to the British official account, was " literally battered to atoms," the three brigs compelled to haul down their colours, and such of the gun-boats, as were not sunk, to seek their safety in flight. Scarcely had the action ended, and the Dictator got afloat, than the gun-boats rallied ; but the latter were so warmly attacked by the Calypso, that they soon ceased their annoyance. Meanwhile the Podargus and Flamer, which latter had also grounded, were warmly engaged with the shore-batteries and another division of gun boats. At length, by the indefatigable exertions of their respective officers and crews, both the Podargus and Flamer got afloat, very much cut up. At 3 a.m. on the 7th the Dictator, Calypso, and the two prize-brigs, the Laaland, commanded by Lieutenant James Wilkie of the Dictator, and the Kiel, by Lieutenant Benjamin Hooper of the Calypso, in attempting to get through the passages, were assailed by a division of gunboats from behind the rocks, so situated that not a gun could be brought to bear upon them from either vessel. In this attack, both prize-brigs, already complete wrecks, grounded ; and, notwithstanding every exertion on the part of the lieutenants and men placed in them, they were obliged to be abandoned : that, too, without being set on fire, owing to the wounded men of their crews remaining on board.

In this very bold and well-conducted enterprise, the British sustained a loss as follows: Dictator, three seamen, one marine, and one boy killed, one midshipman (John Sackett Hooper), one captain's clerk (Thomas Farmer), 16 seamen, two boys, and four marines wounded; Podargus, her purser (George Garratt), one first-class volunteer (Thomas Robilliard), and six seamen and one marine wounded ; Calypso, one seaman and two marines killed, one seaman wounded, and two missing ; and Flamer, one seaman killed, and one midshipman (James Powell) wounded ; total, nine killed, 36 wounded, and two missing. The Danes acknowledged a loss, in killed and wounded together, of 300 officers and men. For their gallant conduct on this occasion, Captain Weir was immediately, and Captain Robilliard in the ensuing December, promoted to post-rank, and the Dictator's first lieutenant, William Buchanan, was made a commander.


DescriptionW005
On the 6th of July, in the evening, as the British 64-gun ship Dictator, Captain James Patteson Stewart, accompanied by the brig-sloops Calypso, 18, Captain Henry Weir, and Podargus, 14, Captain William Robilliard, and gun-brig Flamer, Lieutenant Thomas England, was off Mardoe on the Norway coast, the mast-heads of several vessels were seen over the rocks, known to be a Danish squadron, consisting of the new 40-gun frigate Nayaden, carrying 24-pounders on the main deck, and 48 guns in all, and the 18-gun brigs Laaland, Samsoe, and Kiel. Having a man on board the Podargus acquainted with the place, Captain Robilliard volunteered to lead in after the enemy ; but the Podargus unfortunately took the ground, just as she had entered the passage. Leaving the Flamer to attend her, Captain Stewart stood on with the 64 and the remaining brig. By 7 h. 30 m. p.m. the two vessels, the Calypso leading, had arrived within a mile of the Danish frigate and her consorts, then running, under a press of sail, inside the rocks. Shortly afterwards the engagement began between the Danish squadron and several gun-boats on one side, and the Dictator and Calypso, which latter, having grounded for a short time, was now astern of her consort, on the other. At 9 h. 30 m. P. M„ after having run 12 miles through a passage, in some places scarcely wide enough to admit the Dictator's studding sail booms to be out, Captain Stewart had the satisfaction to run his ship with her bow upon the shore, and her broadside bearing, within hailing distance, upon the Danish frigate and three brigs, all of whom had anchored close together, with springs on their cables, in the small creek of Lyngoe.

The Calypso closely followed the Dictator; and such was the well-directed fire opened from the two British vessels, especially from the 64, that the Nayaden, according to the British official account, was " literally battered to atoms," the three brigs compelled to haul down their colours, and such of the gun-boats, as were not sunk, to seek their safety in flight. Scarcely had the action ended, and the Dictator got afloat, than the gun-boats rallied ; but the latter were so warmly attacked by the Calypso, that they soon ceased their annoyance. Meanwhile the Podargus and Flamer, which latter had also grounded, were warmly



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