Ingermanland

10765
Nominal Guns66RWAS
NationalityRussia
OperatorBaltic Sea
Keel Laid Down15.10.1712RWAS
Acquired1.5.1715RWAS
Home Port W006
ShipyardSaint Petersburg - Russia W006
Ship ClassIngermanland ClassW006
Designed byPeter MikhailovW006
ConstructorRichard Cozens (d.1738)RWAS
CategoryThird RateRWAS
Ship TypeShip of the Line W006
Sailing RigShip RiggedW006
Broken Up1739W006

Dimensions


DimensionMeasurementTypeMetric EquivalentRWAS
Length of Gundeck151' 0"Imperial Feet46.0248 
Breadth42' 0"Imperial Feet12.8016 
Depth in Hold18' 3"Imperial Feet5.4959 
Displacement1,992Ton 

Armament


1715Broadside Weight = 504 Russian Artillery Pound (549.36 lbs 249.1776 kg)RWAS
Lower Gun Deck26 Russian 24-Pounder
Upper Gun Deck26 Russian 12-Pounder
Quarterdeck/Forecastle12 Russian 6-Pounder

1716Broadside Weight = 536 Russian Artillery Pound (584.24 lbs 264.9984 kg)RWAS
Lower Gun Deck24 Russian 30-Pounder
Upper Gun Deck24 Russian 12-Pounder
Quarterdeck/Forecastle16 Russian 4-Pounder

Crew Complement


Date# of MenNotesSource
1715497 B097

4 Commanding Officers


DatesRankNameSource
1715 - 1719CaptainMartin P Gosler (d.1735)W0441720CaptainMartin P Gosler (d.1735)W0441722CaptainMartin P Gosler (d.1735)W0441724CaptainMartin P Gosler (d.1735)W044

Service History


DateEventSource
1715Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1716Peter I's flagship at the "Great Armament"RWAS
1716Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1717Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1718Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1719Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1721Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1722Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1724Cruised in the BalticRWAS
1727repairsRWAS
1731Found unfit for sea serviceRWAS
1738BeachedRWAS

 

Previous comments on this page

Posted by cy on Wednesday 29th of June 2016 11:44

Yep, 3decks should be better than this. I was having a bad day, apologies. the measurement has been corrected to displacement


Posted by Robert Price on Wednesday 29th of June 2016 06:57

I'm sorry but Stephen is correct, there is no way this ship can physically be 1,992 ton burthen, that number is probably her displacement, one of the most common mistakes that even self-described experts make as they think the two are interchangeable, they are not. This is Osprey book level mistake, something 3decks should be above.
If we apply the older formula you mentioned (Length of keel x Beam x Depth in Hold) / 94, the Ingermanland gets about 1,214 tons burthen.

If we use length of keel she has even less. Measuring from inside or outside of planking would only change the tonnage by a couple of tons either way.

This is clearly a mistake in the source used.

The USS Constitution for example is 25ft longer and 2' wider of beam (the only 2 factors that go into any tons bm formula) than the Ingermanland and she is 1576 tons bm and 2,200 tons displacement. So, yeah.

Even more absurdly, the much, much larger HMS Victory is only 2,165 tons bm and 3,500 displacement. And you are determined for her to have nearly the same tonnage here as a 104 gun, 3 deck ship that is 40' longer, 10' wider and 11' deeper?

She simply is not 1,992 tons burthen by any math. Change it to displacement at least, in fact I'm sure that is what it is looking at other ships of her similar size in the sources.

The example of the Intrepid given by Stephen is accurate.

At least anyone coming to the page can see the clear evidence if you are determined to have her given the tonnage of a British 98 gun 2nd rate.


Posted by Cy on Tuesday 24th of May 2016 08:03

Actually the calculation for BM (in England at least) is (Length of keel x Beam x Depth in Hold) / 94, although at one time it used beam / 2. Later it became (length of keel for burthen), which was a calculated measurement and not the actual touch keel length. There is a 19C definition in the Glossary.
Note that different nations also used slightly different criteria for Beam (inside planking or over-all for example), at different times as well.
The burthen is as quoted from the source so I will not be 'correcting' it.


Posted by Stephen on Tuesday 24th of May 2016 02:25

She is not 1992 tons bm. "Builder's Old Measurement (BOM or bm) is the method used from approximately 1650 to 1849, the formula is (Length - (Beam x 3/5)) x Beam x (Beam/2) / 94"
So she is 1180 tons bm. For reference, the HMS Intrepid, 64 guns, is 159' 6" length, 44' 4" beam, she is 1374 bm. Please correct, thank you.

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