Hancock

2505
Nominal Guns6
NationalityUnited States of America
OperatorState Navy
Purchased10.1775
Home Port 
ShipyardUnknown
CategoryHired Vessel
Ship TypeSchooner
Returned to Owners1777

Dimensions


DimensionMeasurementTypeMetric EquivalentDANFS
Length of Gundeck60' 0 "Imperial Feet18.288 
Breadth20' 0 "Imperial Feet6.096 
Burthen72Tons BM 

Armament


10.1775Broadside Weight = 12 Imperial Pound ( 5.442 kg)DANFS
Gun Deck6 American 4-Pounder

Crew Complement


Date# of MenNotesSource
10.177570 

2 Commanding Officers


DatesRankNameSource
1.1.1776 - 4.1776CaptainJohn Manley (1730-1793)DANFS4.1776 - 1776CaptainSamuel TuckerDANFS

Service History


DateEventSource
10.1775Hired from thomas Grant of Marblehead, Massachusettes
10.1775In company with Franklin was ordered to intercept two British brigs in the St Lawrence, instead they cruised off Cape Canso,
10.1775Both ships raided Charlottetown, ignoring orders regarding Candian property
10.1775General George Washington dismissed both ships commanders in regard of their illegal actions, all prizes were returned to
1776Took several prizes as part of the flotilla
1.1.1776John Manley was appointed to command the flotilla and raised his flag in the Hancock
25.1.1776Took two British transports and engaged a British 8 gun schooner
30.1.1776Intercepted by the British Brig Hope (14), Hancock ran aground but was later refloated
7.5.1776Took two brigs off Boston
7.1776In company with the Franklin took the armed ship Peggy and two brigs
12.1776Declared unfit for service
1777Returned to her owner


Fleets

DatesFleetFleet CommanderSource
9.1775-1776Washington's Fleet  

Notes on Ship


Origin
Merchant vessel Speedwell
Regarding the encounter with the British brig HopeB037
As he was coming out of Plymouth January 30, an armed brig (which went from Boston for the purpose of taking him, as he supposed) gave him chase, upon which he ran his vessel on shore a little south of the North River in Scituate. The brig came to anchor and fired not less than four hundred times upon the privateer; but, very remarkable, no man was even wounded. One ball entered the stern and passed but about six inches from Captain Manly, who was confined by sickness in his cabin. The next day one hundred and thirty balls were found upon the adjacent shore. Besides the above, which is from a correspondent near where the affair happened, we hear that after the brig ceased firing she manned her boats, boarded Captain Manly s vessel (the people being ashore) and endeavoured to set her on fire; but seeing our people coming upon them, they were glad to get off without effecting their design. She has since been got off, is refitting and nearly ready for another cruise.

 

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